anti flash white

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Barry
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anti flash white

Postby Barry » Fri Jan 10, 2014 6:51 am

Howaya lads...I've been looking a bit online and I thought I'd ask here if anyone has built anything with anti flash white on it? I'm thinking of doing the Vulcan in the white scheme opposed to the camouflage.. I know there is a company called white ensign models twho do a specific anti flash white but I'd like to hear if anyone else has any other other ideas..one suggestion on a few forums is halfords appliance white..has anyone used this? Would it be too white?

Thanks

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Vinny
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Re: anti flash white

Postby Vinny » Fri Jan 10, 2014 10:11 pm

Hey Barry! Is there a difference between anti-flash white and normal white? If I'm to guess the only thing I can think of is that it's a bright/brilliant white. :oj

I've heard a lot of guys rave about Halfords Appliance White in the airliner modelling world as a good non-yellowing white on airliner models is important. It's supposed to give a great gloss white finish and it's very durable. It should be considering it's designed for white fridges etc. I can't say much about it as I've never used it (I haven't had much success spraying with rattle cans as I've no control over them) but Wayne on here used it on one of his models last year and it turned out really nice. It did look like a bright, brilliant white. Just watch out that you don't lay it on too heavy as I've read reports that it can come out thick.

Personally, for my airliner whites, my favourite is Revell's gloss white enamel (No.04) as it's a bright white and doesn't yellow. I normally add a drop or two of gloss blue to the pot too to prevent any yellowing. Adding blue shifts the white towards the blue end of the spectrum and basically fools the eye. Adding about two drops of blue to the pot will give a nice cold brilliant white. Maybe the anti-flash white has a blue tint to it that's almost imperceptible?? I'd add three drops in that case. Don't be freaked out when the blue goes in, just keep stirring! I used that method for my 787 as the decal instructions stated a "cold white". I build up the white over a few days to prevent any heavy build-up and remove and dust between coats.

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Remember to use acrylic clears, like Tamiya, on the white to prevent yellowing. Oh, and don't' use Future/Klear… some people will argue this but trust me as I've airliners to prove it, Klear WILL yellow white. I personally don't use Klear for anything but canopies.

Tamiya white is good too if you use acrylics and that won't yellow. Add a bit of blue if you want that cold white.

Whatever you do don't even think about using Humbrol's gloss enamel white (no.22). That will start to go yellow on it's own… even the lids on those tins are yellowish! :roll:

HTH
Vinny [smilie=thumb.gif]

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Barry
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Re: anti flash white

Postby Barry » Fri Jan 10, 2014 10:58 pm

Wow vinny thanks for the in depth reply...I thought your airliner knowledge might help me out,now firstly I would have definitely have used klear so that's a nice tip off,
Im fairly used to rattle cans so I'd be confident of getting a good finish with one if I go the appliance white route. If I went the Matt white enamel how many coats would I be looking at out of the airbrush? I'm going to use a grey primer/undercoat to try and tone down the white

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martay
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Re: anti flash white

Postby martay » Fri Jan 10, 2014 11:38 pm

very cool advice there vinny, adding the blue to the pot, u always have a tip in there fella, what blue in particular would u recommend, sky or darker, does it matter? :o)b
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Vinny
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Re: anti flash white

Postby Vinny » Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:28 am

No worries lads! Always happy to pass on the tips if I have them :o)b

@Martay: I normally stick to the medium to light blues when adding to white. A standard blue would be fine but I'd make sure I don't go overboard with it. The lighter blues give you more play than just adding an intense darker blue. I'd definitely only add one drop of a dark blue for normal application. It's a lot easier to add than it is to take away so the lighter blues are better in that sense… adding two drops of dark blue to a pot of white might might make a visible difference and you'd have to add another half pot of white to it to cancel it out. I'd also stick with same brands to be on the safe side in regard to compatibility and mixing. So for Revell Gloss White (04) I'd add a drop or two of Revell Gloss Light Blue (50). For Humbrol Gloss White (22) I'd add Humbrol Gloss French Blue (14). If I was to mix a matt white I'd add a matt blue.

@Barry: You could always decant the Appliance White and run it through your airbrush for more control if you find that it's coming out too heavy from the can. That's what I've noticed with gloss colors from some rattle cans. I've never tried spraying a matt white first and then building up the color that way to finish off with a gloss white/clear gloss. A lot of guys do it that way but I just go for the gloss white from the start and build it up very slowly. Gloss white does tend to orange peel so that's why guys don't like it. Maybe they're just putting it on too heavily and expecting it to cover like other colors. The key for me is very light coats of heavily thinned paint. Recently I've taken to spraying white over a white primer which cuts down a lot of work but does make it difficult to see where I've panted. Spraying over grey will just take an extra couple of coats I'd say. The Revell Gloss White covers really well so there isn't going to be much difference with regards to coverage of a gloss against a matt. I'd probably say for a cold worn white (a white over a grey primer for military aircraft) I'd say you should be looking at about 6-8 very light coats. If it were me I'd build that up two mist coat at a time over 3 to 4 days. The first two coats should hardly be noticeable but don't rush things and expect miracles if you want a nice smooth finish. If you're using matt then you've a better chance of a smooth finish but I'd still recommended light coats built up. And of course you'll still have to think about a gloss finish for the decals.

Just thinking Barry, since you're using a grey primer, it would be nice to make the primer do some pre shading for you. It is a model of a military jet and an allover white aircraft can look very toy-like. If I was going about this, instead of painting the model all over at a time using sweeps of the airbrush, I'd lower the pressure and get in close with the thinned white. Then basically colour inbetween the panel lines… not over them but inside them. Let the overspray be enough for covering the panel lines. That will allow a more intense white over the main panel surface area and then a very subtle amount of grey primer show though around the panel lines. You can regulate the overall intensity of the grey primer showing through with light mist coats of white if the effect is too strong for what you need. I think that would be really nice and add some nice barely noticeable weathering and panel variation. Do you get what I'm trying to describe? :)

Hope that all made sense as I'm rambling on. Any more questions just fire away.

Looking forward to seeing how you get on.

Vinny [smilie=thumb.gif]

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martay
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Re: anti flash white

Postby martay » Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:56 am

Nice one, ill use sky blue in very small doses, the tip of allowing the grey primer to act as a pre shade is also a very cool idea, adding a slight panel pre shade to areas which receive more dirt etc could also give variation to the end result would you think, just ideas popping into the head, rambling a bit myself here too, he he, but thanks for a very concise post on the subject :o)b
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Vinny
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Re: anti flash white

Postby Vinny » Sat Jan 11, 2014 2:19 am

martay wrote:adding a slight panel pre shade to areas which receive more dirt etc could also give variation to the end result would you think

Yeah definitely! I'm all for adding pre shading or anything to add realism to avoid the toy-like look of a model. The pre shading for white would definitely go down well on Russian aircraft. These anti-flash birds were kept very clean so I guess the more subtle the better. It's a very fine like between too clean and too weathered for these Cold War beauties.

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martay
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Re: anti flash white

Postby martay » Sat Jan 11, 2014 3:09 am

Cool, yea thought that would have merit, having never delved into the pre modern cold war era aircraft i havent tried any white top coats, but its one to keep in mind when i run out of WW II subjects, humm might take awhile
for that to happen :) The concept of weathering on white with out creating an over emphasised tone variation is a tricky subject, im deffo gonna have to get the head round trying it at some stage, thanks for the tips as ever Vinny :o)b
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Lego
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Re: anti flash white

Postby Lego » Sat Jan 11, 2014 10:28 am

Christ some great tips in this thread thanks a bunch. That drop of blue tip is ace :o)b

Oh don't forget to keep those halford sprays in doors and not stored in the cold. I find they spray great when warm.

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Spud
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Re: anti flash white

Postby Spud » Sat Jan 11, 2014 1:10 pm

ive no idea on the subject other than white ensign models are robbing bastards.
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